Five bases of powers coercive reward legitimate expert referent powers

Then, remind yourself of a leader who was a renowned expert in his field, or who you really admired for his integrity. How did it feel to work for these leaders, and which one got the best from you? The way a leader behaves toward you and how effectively you work as a result can both depend on the source of her power. And her power need not come from her official status or title.

Five bases of powers coercive reward legitimate expert referent powers

But, as we first talked about here last summer, there are different types of power, and some may be easier for you to obtain than others. To briefly recap, insocial psychologists John French and Bertram Raven identified five bases of power.

The CEO of your company, for example, has legitimate power. A parent has reward power over his children. A specialist physician has expert power. A celebrity has referent power. A military dictator has coercive power. And thinking about your own sources of power strategically is important if you want to influence your colleagues, clients, and other constituents in a positive way.

My go-to type of power is expert, because it affords the individual the most control. Expert power can be secured purely through hard work on your part. So what steps should you take? I alluded to them in a piece last January about positioning yourself as a thought leader in your organization. Learn Everything Read as much as you can about your field — way above and beyond what might be expected.

Secure mentors inside and outside your organization who are more seasoned than you. Build an External Brand Communicating your ideas in writing and speaking at industry conferences are great ways to organize your own thoughts and cast as wide a net as possible with your expertise.

Be Media Savvy Meet with a PR person about what you can offer to the press and pitch interview opportunities related to your expertise.

Written by Alexandra Levit Topics: Subscribe to Quick Base Blog Thank you! The information has been submitted successfully.Feb 02,  · This article explains the Five Forms of Power, by John French and Bertram Raven in a practical way. After reading you will understand the basics of this powerful leadership theory..

Background Five Forms of Power. Social psychologists John R. P. French and Bertram H. Raven conducted a remarkable study about power in They stated that power is divided into five Ratings: Coercive, reward and legitimate power can be categorized in the formal power category.

The remaining two types,expert and referent power,are personal powers.

Five bases of powers coercive reward legitimate expert referent powers

Let’s take a . Coercive, legitimate, reward, referent, and expert are the five types of power. Someone can create power through one or more of these bases.

Five bases of powers coercive reward legitimate expert referent powers

There is the possibility that . Five Bases of Power Legitimate Reward Coercive Expert Referent Examples of Power in the Workplace Position Power Thank You! Any Questions? References Most Desirable Powers Least Desirable Powers Legitimate Power Rewards Power Referent Power Expert Power Coercive Power Turner, M.

C. ().

In , French and Raven described five bases of power: Coercive – This comes from the belief that a person can punish others for noncompliance. Six years later, Raven added an extra power base: Legitimate. Reward. Expert. Referent. Coercive. And, six years later, added an extra power base. Five Bases of Power Legitimate Reward Coercive Expert Referent Examples of Power in the Workplace Position Power Thank You! Any Questions? References Most Desirable Powers Least Desirable Powers Legitimate Power Rewards Power Referent Power Expert Power Coercive Power Turner, M. C. (). Coercive: a person achieves compliance from others through the threat of punishment. A military dictator has coercive power. A military dictator has coercive power. In today’s business world, the most effective leaders mostly use a mix of expert and referent power, though many have legitimate and reward .

Aug 13,  · The five bases of variables, namely legitimate, reward, coercive, expert, and referent power proposed by French and Raven were measured by using Hinkin and Schriesheim’s method.

In addition, the items for another two power bases, namely information and connection, were taken from the work by Ansari (). The original French and Raven () model included five bases of power – reward, coercion, legitimate, expert, and referent – however, informational power was added by .

The 5 Types of Power Revisited